The Whetstone 2-Sided Sharpening Stone is made from professional grade corundum and will sharpen everything from a razor blade to a cleaver and even a machete, should you happen to have a machete lying about that needs sharpening. This is the simplest type of sharpener it’s true but the company have obviously put a great deal of thought into the product.
The 8,000 grit Kitayama is definitely a popular 8K stone, it is my favourite, and the feedback has much to do with that. It is silky smooth and feels creamy when you use it. When reaching refinement levels of 6k and above, polished bevels/edge are inevitable, and often sought after. The level of polish from this particular stone is very beautiful, assuming that you have done some refinement prior to this but it is a wonderful 8,000 grit stone.
Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular movements up and down along the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and stone. You will notice a burr become visible after five or so movements. Mentally divide the blade into three sections if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.
Works well. Just got it today, sharpened two pocket knives, one a 8Cr13MoV Chinese steel, the other s30v American steel The stone made short work of both steels (which were pretty sharp already). But notably was able to make the s30v hair shaving sharp easily, something I've had trouble with. Inexpensive and useful, I love this stone. It's not the Ninja sharp 8000+ grits that you can find, but for pocket knives and EDC, it's perfect and inexpensive. Get One!!!!!!!!!!!!
Unfortunately, the arrays of modern whetstone can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpeners that so often times many of them end up with a crap or wrong decision on stone type for their utensils. The most difficult to determine is whether the whetstone is fake or fabricated with low quality of materials. To avoid this you can only go for the reliable brand of a whetstone.
I bought this and Unimi's 600/1000 whetstone at the same time. Curiously, reviews are currently blocked for their 600/1000 model, as amazon wouldn't let me leave one for it. Considering the conspicuous absence of reviews in the other stone's listing, one can only assume they're being censored for everyone. So, maybe I should be more critical of these stones, and use them a while longer before giving them any praise? But I've had a very positive experience with them so far, and the 600/1000 stone was the one I found most useful.
Unfortunately, the arrays of modern whetstone can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpeners that so often times many of them end up with a crap or wrong decision on stone type for their utensils. The most difficult to determine is whether the whetstone is fake or fabricated with low quality of materials. To avoid this you can only go for the reliable brand of a whetstone.
Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.
I recommend it as a lightweight alternative to larger stone for smaller knives. Leather necklace is comfortable and seems strong. I conditioned it for suppleness and swim with it on tightened as a choker. Stone is small, dog-tag size. I use it with water. Functional for small folder knives and multi-tools. Not useful for large fixed blades, since you can't make a long stroke. Small to grip. I use double-sided tape on one side to keep it in place on a flat rock. Not sure of grit, seems like around 1000. It took a while, but i got my old boy scout knife sharp.
Method 1: Use an Electric Sharpener. Quality electric sharpeners are an option, but I strongly discourage their use. First off, they remove a tremendous amount of material from your edge. Sharpen your knife a dozen times, and you've lost a good half-centimeter of width, throwing it off balance, and rendering any blade with a bolster (i.e. most high-end forged blades) useless. Secondly, even the best models provide only an adequate edge. If you don't mind replacing your knives every few years and are happy with the edge they give you, they'll do the trick. But a much better choice is to...
The height of the spine of your knife off of the stone below it will determine the angle. A typical sharpening angle for a typical chef knife is 19 or 20 degrees per side. For the sake of removing confusing obstacles that could hinder your progress, let’s just sharpen your knife at 20 degrees per side. You can determine exactly how high off the stone that knife should be held by measuring the height of your blade at the heel and then dividing that number by 3 for a 20 deg angle.
Whetstone has two different sides of grain for sharpening and polishing knife edges. These softer Japanese stones have several advantages over harder stones. Because they are softer, they do not become glazed or loaded with detritus. Plus, they are lubricated effectively with water rather than oil, but can be used with either. Submerge the stone in water for about 5 - 10 minutes. Continue to apply water while sharpening with the Whetstone Cutlery Two sided Whetstone Sharpening Stone. The stone releases small particles during the sharpening process; this powder in combination with water allows the sharpening. After a while you will notice a small burr at the edge. Now repeat the same process on the other side of the blade. Finally, turn the stone over and repeat the procedure, this time using the finer grit of the stone. In order to remove the remaining burr, pull the blade at an angle over the stone. Rinse the stone and clean off the grinding residue. Clean your knife with hot water.
Ceramic sharpening stones were the early replacement for natural stones. Unfortunately there are huge differences in the quality of ceramic stones so be wary. Some are extremely soft and dish out very quickly and at the other end of the spectrum some are so hard they tend to glaze over in a hurry. Ceramic stones need a good soaking for about 10 or more minutes to saturate the pores of the stone prior to use. As all knife steels are different we tend to find that ceramic stones tend to work better with some knives over others. There are no hard and fast rules but we like ceramic for Ao-ko and single edged knives. The Kaiden Ceramic stones are the fastest cutting Japanese stones in Australia and are recommended for advanced users.
Your primary goal is just to improve the edge, make it a little bit sharper. Manage you’re expectations and don’t worry about getting the knife ready for eye surgery on day one. Ignore all those YouTube videos where you see folks performing miracles with their knives, forget that completely. You just want to make the knife a little less dull and by doing so you will achieve what most people will never even attempt. You want to get a taste of sharpening success and it can happen quickly. If you are reading this, or any other cool sharpening tips, you’re on the right path.
However, due to limited natural deposits and extensive quarrying over the centuries, true, high quality, Japanese water stones are now few and far between and are very expensive. Thus, various companies are now producing synthetic Japanese Water Stones which generally have a more consistent composition and grit size than natural stones as well as often begin somewhat harder and thus, lasting a bit longer; not to mention being cheaper to purchase.

Very handsome and functional. The leather that makes up the necklace is high quality and the knot they use is seldom seen. I was able to touch up my bark River gunny sidekick with it( m4 steel at 62-64 hrc!), And that is saying something. Haven't tested the fish hook groove, because I don't generally fish in the winter, but I'm looking forward to trying it out
Pressure is something that is sometimes not mentioned but in my experience and in my opinion, it is extremely important to apply the correct amount of pressure, I use three different levels of sharpening pressure, with my sharpening pressure being measured on a scale from 1-5 with 1 being very light and 5 being maximum pressure. When you initiate the sharpening process, when you have all your ducks lined up and you are ready to start, use P4 (Pressure at level 4, almost maximum). in this case it is you and the stone working together, you are going to apply pressure with your finger tips (2 or 3 finger tips) placed as close to the primary edge as you can get, i.e. over the area you are working on, on the opposite side of the blade. As you push the knife away from you in a trailing motion, apply P4 pressure to the knife as it glides over the wet whetstone, (whet means sharpen) you will see the black residue start to form in the water on the surface, this is Swarf and this is good, don’t feel obliged to remove this with water, it is fine. Continue working from the heel to the tip of the knife moving your fingers along the edge and applying pressure as you move the knife away from you on the right side of the knife and as you pull it towards you on the left side, these are called edge trailing strokes.
A: When it comes to the best knife sharpeners used in a domestic setting the abrasives used to sharpen the blade should last for quite a few years. When they do eventually wear out many of the best manufacturers will refurbish them for you, typically for a nominal fee. Again, however, unless you are using the sharpener on a daily basis (and there is virtually no reason the average person would do this), the sharpener should last for many years before ever needing service.
For this type of hand held manual sharpener the 463 does an extraordinary job thanks mostly to the diamond abrasive wheels. You get an edge that’s both razor sharp and burr-free, as if you spent an hour working the edge on an oil stone. If people make a mistake with the 463 it’s that they assume more pressure is needed than actually is. Keep in mind though that it really shines on serrated and straight edged, double bevel Asian-style knives.
My name is Peter Nowlan, a retired Naval Officer. I became interested in Knife Sharpening 35 years ago starting on oilstones after watching my father sharpen a chisel. It was a trial and error thing at that time as there was no internet back then and nobody I knew had the same interest. I started my business, New Edge Sharpening, in Halifax (Canada) to make extra money just to feed my obsession with water stones but the business took off and I am truly enjoying an abundance of dull knives to sharpen.
Start off on the rough grit side of the stone. Check the grit on your stone, or the packaging that came with the stone, to identify which is which. In general, whetstones and diamond stones each have different grits on either side. The rough grit side is used to grind the steel down, while the fine grit side is used to sharpen or hone the knife. The grinding process comes first, so you start on the rough grit side.

first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg


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The following are my personal favourites and they are all synthetic stones, I do have experience with natural what stones but lets keep it simple, lets stick to synthetic water stones. Believe me, some of the world sharpest knives are sharpened solely on synthetic stones. Here are my personal favourites, I use these water stones every day and the order is not necessarily in priority, they are all good.
The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.
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Serrated blades have a grind on one side of the blade. Only sharpen the grind side of the blade. Hold the sharpener at the angle that matches the original edge angle. Hold the knife with the edge away from you and the serrated side of the edge facing up. Set the tapered diamond sharpener in a serration so that you fill the indentation. Draw the sharpener towards the edge.
You must put the knife blade's position at the perfect angle which is called "against the stone." What's important is the blade should be facing opposite from you. Where you've determined where the bevel angle is located, then this is what you will position against the stone. It's a good idea to know the differences between various angles for certain blade uses. There's a certain height of the blade that it should be from the stone. You'll be able to find various charts on height of the blade online. Normally, for a pocket knife or kitchen knife, it'll be 17° - 22° angle against the stone. The "Rule of thumb" is the smaller the angle, the sharper the knife. Most makers will have it in the instruction or on their official website.
A single stone of 120 grit and a combination stone of 1000 and 3000 grits come along with a stone holder all for a price of less than many other individual stones. The stones are 6 7/8" long and 2 1/8" wide. A flattening stone of some kind would be needed, but with economical options available in those, the overall price of this kit would still be low. This entry level set is a good budget minded option.
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When starting out sharpening, it won’t be long before you hear about the “toothy” vs “polished” edge. It will suffice to know that a 1k stone is going to give you an edge that will perform beautifully as will a knife finished at 5k. There is a belief that a knife that has a highly polished finish, 5k and up will be so polished that it’s toothy goodness will be erased. This knife will not bite into the skin of a tomato for example because the edge is too polished, it will slide over the top. This is not always true, if the knife has been sharpened well, i.e. if Side A and Side B of the blade meet precisely at the Apex of the knife, that edge will slide into a tomato quite beautifully. I have seen many brand new Japanese knives with highly polished 8k edges that no tomato skin can stand up to.
At this point, I can flip the stone over and use the fine course side. Most Whetstones come with a nice wooden base that do a good job to hold the stone in place while sharpening. Before starting, you might need to add a bit more water to the surface. Now with the fine course stone, finish the sharpening process like before at the same blade angle and nice consistent passes along the stone. About 10 to 12 passes is good before switching to the other side of the blade. At this point, the blade should be extremely sharp. I’ll just give a quick paper test here. I can now slice paper quite easily with my knife.
Honing is kind of like dusting the furniture while sharpening is more like reupholstering the furniture. Honing is purely a maintenance activity that should be regularly practiced to make sure the blade is clean and sharp as can be every time you use it. It’s easily done using a honing rod, a leather strop or a sharpening stone; as most stones have a side for sharpening and a side for honing. Honing is akin to trimming your hair to remove the split ends. It’s not a full on haircut. What it does is realign the tiny sharp protrusions along the edge of the blade that can be bent over with use, so that they stand more or less straight.
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